June 22 2015

System Center Endpoint Protection (SCEP) support for Windows Server 2003

As we all know, as of July 14 2015, Windows Server 2003 will no longer be a supported operating system. This means that customers using Windows Server 2003 will no longer receive new security updates, non-security updates, free or paid assisted support options or online technical content updates from Microsoft.

However, it isn’t that well publicised that on this same date, customers using System Center Endpoint Protection on Windows Server 2003 will stop receiving updates to antimalware definitions and the engine for Windows Server 2003.

As a result, the SCEP agent will stop functioning.  Starting on July 14 2015, systems running Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 that have the System Center 2012 Endpoint Protection client installed will receive the following system tray notification:

SCEP notification
SCEP notification
SCEP notification
SCEP notification

Time to get off Windows 2003!



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June 18 2015

Why we need to keep Domain Controllers physically secure

This purpose of this post is to highlight another reason we need to keep Domain Controllers physically secure – in fact the principle here also applies to standard Windows Servers too.

My home test lab had been powered down for a few months and I’d forgotten my Domain Administrator password. I knew there was a method to log onto a Windows Server without a username and password back in Windows Server 2003 and I thought that surely this still wouldn’t work with Windows Server 2012 R2 – however to my horror it still did. Here is how I reset my Domain Administrator account password – scary stuff!

Forgotten password
Forgotten password
Forgotten password
Forgotten password

So I’d forgotten my Domain Administrator password. Time to attach the Windows Server 2012 R2 ISO to the VM.

Attach ISO
Attach ISO

Adjust the boot order to force booting from ISO first.

Boot to DVD/ISO

Restart the VM and boot to the DVD/ISO. Click Next on the first setup screen. On the following screen make sure you select “Repair your computer”.

Next
Next
Repair your computer
Repair your computer

Then click on “Troubleshoot” followed by “Command Prompt”

Troubleshoot
Troubleshoot
Command Prompt
Command Prompt

You will now be presented with a Command Prompt.  Change your directory to c:\Windows\System32.  Then rename the Utilman.exe executable by running the command “ren Utilman.exe Utilman.exe.old”.  Then make a copy of cmd.exe named Utilman.exe using the command “copy cmd.exe Utilman.exe”.  See below screenshot.

Replace Utilman
Replace Utilman

Close the command prompt and restart the machine, booting back into the regular Windows logon screen.  Once the logon screen is presented, press the “Windows Key” and “U”.  Much to your horror you will see a Command Prompt appear. If you check Task Manager, you will see that the Command Prompt (executable called Utilman.exe) is running in the SYSTEM context.  Given that this is a Domain Controller, effectively this mean the commands run within the Command Prompt are executed with the Domain Admin permission level.

SYSTEM context
SYSTEM context

To reset the Domain Administrator account password, we simply need to run the “net user Administrator password” command.

Reset password

You can now close the Command Prompt and log onto the domain with the Administrator account and the newly set password.

I have also seen this work with the Sticky Keys executable (sethc.exe) being replaced instead of Utilman.exe.

 

Once again this highlights why we need to keep our Domain Controllers physically secure – from this demo you can see that anyone with physical access to the server can have control over your entire Active Directory domain in a very short amount of time!